Recent Changes

Tuesday, September 1

  1. page Course Organizers edited ... Course Coordinator and Webinar Moderator Stephen Laubach, UW-Madison Arboretum Earth Partners…
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    Course Coordinator and Webinar Moderator
    Stephen Laubach, UW-Madison Arboretum Earth Partnership for Schools Program, Madison, WI (slaubach@wisc.edu)
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    Schools program. He also teaches courses in education, biology, and conservation for preservice teachers at Edgewood College in Madison. Steve previously
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    Logistical Support
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    8:21 pm

Friday, June 20

  1. page Assignments TO DATE edited ... 9. Posted on the 4/10 discussion webinar page (http://eps-spring2014course.wikispaces.com/4.10…
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    9. Posted on the 4/10 discussion webinar page (http://eps-spring2014course.wikispaces.com/4.10.14-Kris+Stepenuck)? DUE 4/21.
    10. Attended the 5/1 webinar or listened to the recording?
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    DUE 5/12.
    12. Kept a reflective journal for webinars and in-person meetings that will be used for an analysis writing assignment (see course syllabus)? DUE 5/9.
    13. Implemented an EPS or related outdoor learning activity to present at your city's final meeting? Presentations on 5/8/14 in Milwaukee, Chicago, Muskegon, and Cleveland; 5/15/14 in Detroit.
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    Claire? DUE by 5/15/14.
    We are understanding of late work under reasonable circumstances. Please complete all assignments, regardless of the current date, and email Claire at cshaller@wisc.edu if the deadline has passed.
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    12:34 pm
  2. page Participants edited Below is a powerpoint slideshow of participants at each site. Make sure to watch it first without g…
    Below is a powerpoint slideshow of participants at each site. Make sure to watch it first without going into "slideshow mode" so you can read the stories that go along with the photos in the "notes" section below the slide. As you can see, we have a wonderful group of teachers working with all age groups in schools and nature centers across the Upper Midwest. We are still updating this so please send your photo and the story behind it to EPS Office Manager Claire Shaller (cshaller@wisc.edu).
    {webinar participants.pptx} (Note: Since the spring 2014 course is now complete, this file has be removed. Please contact Claire Shaller, schaller@wisc.edu, if you have any questions)
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    12:34 pm

Friday, May 30

  1. page 2.20.14-Isaac Cottrell edited ... Click here to access Isaac's presentation. Click on the "download" button that appea…
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    Click here to access Isaac's presentation. Click on the "download" button that appears and then click on the "prezi" icon. This may require assistance from a media specialist at your school or public library. Please contact Claire Shaller (cshaller@wisc.edu) if you have any questions about accessing this file or the presentation recording below.
    Presentation Recording
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    the webinar: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7aactdz00TWOWtpcUpUWTNPYjg/edit?usp=sharing.https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1ktQvOy25a9dHY5VXgtaVBZam8/edit?usp=sharing.
    Reflection Question - please respond to one of the two questions below by Monday, 3/3/14. You may respond in a separate thread so that people can comment on each other's posts more easily.
    There are many resources available to educators, some specific to your area, some more general. What resources (human, financial, natural, other) do you have available to you, and who might you talk to to explore additional resources? Or, for those that are informal educators or work in other settings, what can you or your connections offer to groups that are working on projects?
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    9:42 am

Thursday, May 15

  1. msg Land Health Advocacy message posted Land Health Advocacy It would seem to me that teaching students about water quality monitoring is a valuable first step …
    Land Health Advocacy
    It would seem to me that teaching students about water quality monitoring is a valuable first step in involving them in continuing advocacy. If you tell students that they MUST get out there and be apostles for the Earth, that's probably not going to work. It never helps to be preachy. What works better is simply teaching the students the importance of stewardship, by having them be involved in it for themselves--just as this course is advocating. By seeing first-hand the importance of the work, and the consequences (good and bad) of human interference in waterways and other ecosystems, they should come to a realization of the importance of advocacy on their own People will save only what they understand, and understand only what they love--so we must first teach students to love nature, which will enable them to open their minds to understanding its intricacies. Once they have this understanding,advocacy will naturally follow for many students.

Wednesday, May 14

  1. msg Very Inspiring message posted Very Inspiring What a great range of projects. The small rain garden led by the kindergarten class at Ringwood an…
    Very Inspiring
    What a great range of projects. The small rain garden led by the kindergarten class at Ringwood and all the help and materials that came from the parents and the community. I loved the raindrop roll by the kids to figure out the slope and where the water ends up during a rain event. The growth of the program at the STEAM school in Detroit is wonderful and to hear about all the kids wanting to be involved not for a grade but just because it's a good thing to do. I also enjoyed the science process involved in planting the native seeds and the turn around from the first and second attempts. The involvement of the kids in the decision to try again and talk about errors and how to better improve the conditions was a great teaching moment.
    Thank you everyone for your great work bring nature and the outdoors to your students and communities.
    11:51 am
  2. msg Post from Ronace Hogan message posted Post from Ronace Hogan (Ronace Hogan): What an excellent webinar!!!!! All three were outstanding and very inspiring. T…
    Post from Ronace Hogan
    (Ronace Hogan):

    What an excellent webinar!!!!! All three were outstanding and very inspiring.
    Twenty-five years ago I taught in Detroit and Greening of Detroit and the Rouge River projects were just getting going. I belonged to both...and you were kinda on your own. There weren't many resources or excellent partners like the one Mitch and Chad have.....great job guys. I love that Detroit has so many green projects going, especially in the inner city. These two amazing guys are doing such a great job...inspiring not only the youth, their partners and anyone else who sees what their doing. Teaching students to grow and value trees in a city that's primarily cement and asphalt.... summer time in Detroit is almost unbearable from the heat being absorbed into all the buildings and concrete, with only a few trees that struggle to give relieve. I'm sending love and energy to them, to help teach their students can impact global warming and slow it down for their future and the future of their children. AWESOME

    We all need to be a part of "A Child's Garden" and give hope to our future and the hopefully many generations to come. It is so sad that many of our students see what nature is when and if we are able to take them on a field trip to a Nature Center or State Park. The EPS lessons are great for all teachers to use as a starting point, project ideas, future projects and an excellent resource and collection of lessons that help children understand nature, the importance of making a rain garden, butterfly garden or the many lessons about water and how it's our most important and valuable resource. Most inner city children have never heard of a prairie, let alone plant one. How each of earth's habitats connect and depend on one another. The value of each plant and animal found in them, the connections and webs.....Thank you to all teachers who do this valuable and important work. It does take up so much of our own time, money and energy. It's not easy to get materials, partners and other teachers to work with you. Our common core curriculum leaves us very little school time during the school day, so most of us have to work with an after school earth club.
    Fundraising, getting tools and equipment that we need, calls for a very resourceful teacher. Know that with each project, each workshop, meeting like minded teachers, our projects will be better and bigger. Know that even planting one tree makes a big difference. What we do teaching our students about being green and loving the earth will be our dearest and greatest accomplishments. Bless all of us who do these great earth projects and the awesome professors who offer these great classes to help and support us.
    11:19 am
  3. msg Presentation Discussion message posted Presentation Discussion Jesica Lamden Blandford Nature Center Grand Rapids, MI
    Presentation Discussion
    Jesica Lamden
    Blandford Nature Center
    Grand Rapids, MI
    10:34 am
  4. msg Presentation Discussion message posted Presentation Discussion I found great value from all of the presenters on 5/1, and want to thank all of the presenters for …
    Presentation Discussion
    I found great value from all of the presenters on 5/1, and want to thank all of the presenters for their inspiring work. I agree with Ashley Okel about the fact that initiating large projects in a school, or even a nature center, can be extremely daunting without support from administration. It was encouraging to hear about all of the creative ways these projects were landed and to hear about the many unique partnership opportunities that I hadn't considered.

    I found it interesting to ponder how the potential for positive impact on the land is increased with partnerships. When community organizations are included in school EE projects, it opens the door for all individuals involved to create a relationship with the land. So often I find myself focusing solely on my students and wanting them to find this connection and carry that passion out into their greater community. During the presentations, I was thinking about how challenging this can be with certain students. It seems that partnerships with boy scouts, religious groups, and afterschool programs can connect these students via a back door approach.

    I also wanted to say that I loved how the first grade students studied slope. How kinesthetically appropriate to have them roll down hills to compare slope. Great work! I completely agree with the presenters that first graders can learn just about anything if the teacher is creative enough to bring it to their level of understanding. Thank you for sharing!
    10:33 am
  5. page Earth Partnership and Other Resources edited ... Courtesy of Chad Segrist: Detroit Institute of Technology's "The Spring Thing" is ta…
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    Courtesy of Chad Segrist: Detroit Institute of Technology's "The Spring Thing" is taking place April 12th, weather permitting. It is the launch festival for greenhouse renovation, seed propagation, plantings, urban garden, and an outdoor classroom.
    Courtesy of Ashley Okel: Summit County (Ohio) Soil and Water Conservation District has an enviroscape (watershed model) and a groundwater model to checked out and an awesome "Fruitvale Lab" that models a point source water pollution that tests wells all over the town to determine what the source is. It comes with "water samples" for 40 wells around town to determine pollution.
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    flyer for an upcoming event at their school, Detroit events:Institute of Technology (May 17)
    {DIT Recreational Day May 17.pdf}
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    9:22 am

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